rambling

200910081047.jpg

Several months ago I managed to grab some tickets to Ignite Boise 2 from a friend. It was the most fun I've had watching a live performance in a while. Half of it was the fast-paced, multi-faceted topics and presenters, and the other half was a jam-packed room full of slightly inebriated, vocal participants. It felt like there was no third wall, and that it was more of a sport than a sit-on-your-hands-and-listen gig. So, as my family eagerly awaits the availability of tickets (attendance is free, but you can get tickets to get in early), I decided to go ahead and submit a talk for Ignite Boise 3 in November. I've been on this planet for a while now, and I've gathered enough interesting techniques for getting the most out of living to fill a 5-minute slot.

Life is short, we should be spending more of it doing what makes us happy!

And this talk will summarize just about everything I've learned about how to do just that. In Extreme Productivity, I hope to introduce the uninitiated into a slew of techniques for increasing enthusiasm (the very core of productive living), outline a mindset that attracts opportunity, and lay down some principles - many backed by scientific research - that will help you get more done in the limited waking hours of our life (and maybe even the non-waking ones!). Here's the one-minute bullet-pointed run down of some of the topics I'll be covering:

  • How to fit more in your head without a lobotomy
  • Increase your waking
  • How to make work suck way less
  • The myth of multi-tasking
  • Introducing multi-purposing
  • The body is a truffle - How to use your body to please your mind
  • How the people around you affect your attitude (and how you can affect their affect on you)



Last weekend I attended DrupalCamp Colorado, and thought I should jot down a few of my personal highlights.

The Hostel

I reserved a dorm bed at a local hostel. Maybe the creepiest place I've ever been. When you register, on the counter is a ventriloquist doll, folded in half with it's legs behind his head. Next to the doll is a communal bowl of chips. Like, potato chips. BBQ flavored. Now, I appreciate the sharing attitude, but would have been far more comfortable plunging my hand into a bowl of individually wrapped candies. After a series of strange events which I hesitate to recount (just in case involved parties are tracking my posts) but which kind of pushed me over the edge of creepiness, a fellow attendee offered to let me stay at his place, and I gratefully accepted. After I presented at one session, someone who actually stayed at the hostel let me know that out of a couple of months of traveling through Europe and Asia, the Denver hostel was the dirtiest he'd seen, and I'd done good by not staying there. The result is a good story with lots of embellishments if you're (un?)fortunate enough to hear the whole tale in person.

The Sessions

I ended up attending a lot of sessions, which I haven't done at previous camps / Drupalcons. I got some good stuff out of the security session with Greg Knaddison, Ezra Gildesgame and Ben Jeavons. Also, got some D6 theming goodness, presented by Stephanie Pakrul and Jay Wolf from Top Notch Themes. The stuff going on with the Skinr module really got me excited, and hearing how TNT improved their conversion rates so drastically using just a few intuitive techniques and very little time was excellent. Ended up sitting in on a few sessions that were a little under my point on the learning curve, but I enjoyed those as well because I was watching for presentation styles, since I gave my first session ever on Sunday.

Good wifi access, fun backchannel discussion, excellent lunch with TNT people and my friend Josh Brauer. There was enough time between sessions to get some socializing done (my favorite part of Drupal events) and meet some Denver folks.

The People

I got a really good vibe from everyone at the Camp. In contrast to Drupalcon (I'm still pretty green when it comes to Drupal events), I enjoyed the atmosphere of a smaller event. Ended up talking to the same people several times, and felt less lost in the crowd. I met a lot of people I'd love to chat with again, and got to put a lot of faces to names I'd only seen in IRC. I came home seriously considering the idea of taking an extended vacation (6 months or a couple years) in the area, just to be around such an active, fun bunch of Drupal folks. The experience anchored my resolution to attend a decent-sized event at least once every couple of months, to keep connected with the really neat people that make up the Drupal community.

Giving a Presentation

I was thankful to have the opportunity to present a session, and that the audience was probably too sedated by the unlimited pizza lunch to judge me too harshly. It went well, at least from my perspective. I kept on time, didn't freak out, and managed to make a few people laugh. The goal of the session was to jumpstart folks who haven't really taken part in community discourse yet, and go over the basics of getting involved. So hopefully, a couple more folks are a little closer to making that leap, or better yet actually took it. I learned that 45 minutes is pitifully short to cover a subject in-depth, and that it would have been nice to have more time for answering questions and getting feedback about what was missing from the presentation so I can make it better next time.

Conclusionary Stuff

I'm looking forward to presenting again, got a little more excited about doing a DrupalCamp in Idaho, am considering taking my wife back to Denver to evaluate an extended vacation there, learned that if you teach something you end up believing it simply through extended exposure, was surprised at my stamina after waking up at 3am, hope to pay some hospitality forward in turn, and am looking forward to hooking up with a lot of the great folks at the camp again. Oh, and if I get back to Denver I'm totally hitting up Chedds. A grilled cheese bistro? Beautiful.



I like earbuds because they're so compact, but they're kind of annoying to stuff into your pocket. They invariably get tangled, and they often get bent in funky ways, especially if you wrap them around something. I scoured the web looking for some good cases, and didn't really find anything that would fit nicely in my pocket. There are lots of tutorials online for building your own, but after experimenting with a couple Altoids tins I trashed the idea.

Later, in a wave of pure inspiration (probably induced by a sugar binge), I discovered the perfect receptacle: a pill bottle. Below is a picture with instructions. These work perfect for the newest iPhone earbuds without the permanent disfigurement that comes with wrapping wire incorrectly.

200905302155.jpg

Instructions:

  1. Fold earbuds in half
  2. Fold in half again
  3. Fold in half again
  4. Fold in half one more time
  5. Slip into pill bottle, you shouldn't need to bend anything to get it to fit, though the twisting motion of putting on the lid will help spin any extraneous bits down into the bottle.


Syndicate content